It was Graham Findlay on nb. Armadillo who prompted this post by kindly sending me copies of these two photos he’d taken passing Bridge 104 on the Oxford Canal:

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Photo by Graham Findlay
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Photo by Graham Findlay

He’d thought initially that he’d spotted a re-used Anderson shelter; it turned out to be another example of utility corrugated sheeting – the humble Pig Ark.

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They’re an example of stunningly basic, yet highly effective, utility shelters. They’re strong, weatherproof and stable. And admirably provide the essentials, namely shelter and warmth.
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Typically they’re constructed from three arcs of corrugated sheeting and have timber ends.
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And, like so many corrugated iron structures, they’re under threat, as farmers increasingly look to source lighter and more durable materials, such as plastic, as in this example…
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Arks are adaptable and lend themselves to replication, as this view shows…
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Arks are also mobile, here they’ve just been moved into a new field and are standing vertically yet dropped into place.
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Strong, stable, weatherproof, warm, and versatile – mmm… I have an idea! Why not convert Arks into snug rigid tents for revelers – as happened at this Danish festival!

ps. if you have any ideas for buildings that could be featured in this series please feel free to leave a suggestion…

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