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Some of the ‘wrinkled tin’ posts could be sub-titled ‘corrugated iron conquers the world’. The build qualities of corrugated and galvanised iron having been tested and proved in extreme climates across the planet, as this post perhaps demonstrates…

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Wales, is a historic Inupiat Eskimo village on the Seward Peninsula, where Alaska stretches toward Siberia. During the Cold War, Soviet and U.S. submarines played cat-and-mouse games beneath the icy waters while fighter jets chased one another above. The Soviets manned a radar station on an island in the strait, whilst the U.S. Air Force watched from an outpost near Wales. Next to the village itself, the U.S. Navy operated a submarine research facility.

In 1778, explorer Captain James Cook named it Cape Prince of Wales. Eskimos called it Kingigin, or “high bluff,” and called themselves Kingikmiut, “people of the high place.”  A burial mound from the Birnirk culture (A.D. 500 to 900) was discovered near Wales and is now a National Landmark.

In 1890, the American Missionary Association established a mission at the site of present-day Wales. In the 1890s, reindeer(domesticated caribou) were brought to the area and in 1894 a reindeer station was established. Wales became an important whaling center due to its location along whale migratory routes, and it was the region’s largest and most prosperous village, with more than 500 residents.

The influenza epidemic from 1918 to 1919 decimated the population and economy of Wales.

Wales airport

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So this is Wales, an outpost of wrinkled tin and icy Cold War relics.

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Thanks to Graham Kennison for pointing me in the direction of Wales, Alaska.

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One thought on “Wales, an outpost of Corrugated Iron?

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